For the identification of insects and other fauna and flora of South Africa: please click on the following links:
Insects and related species: Antlions - Ants - Bees - Beetles - Bugs - Butterflies, Moths and Caterpillars - Centipedes and Millipedes - Cockroaches - Crickets - Dragonflies and Damselflies - Grasshoppers and Katydids - Mantis - Stick Insects - Ticks and Mites - Wasps - Woodlice
Plants, Trees, Flowers: (Note: Unless plants fall into a specific species such as Cacti, they have been classified by their flower colour to make them easier to find) Bonsai - Cacti, Succulents, Aloes, Euplorbia - Ferns and Cycads - Flowers - Fungi, Lichen and Moss - Grass - Trees
Animals, Birds, Reptiles etc.: Animals, Birds, Fish and Crabs - Frogs - Lizards - Scorpions - Snails and Slugs - Snakes - Spiders - Tortoise, Turtles and Terrapins - Whipscorpions
Other photography: Aeroplanes - Cars and Bikes - Travel - Sunrise - Water drops/falls - Sudwala and Sterkfontein Caves etc.

Sunday, January 12, 2014

Cape Plane Tree (Ochna arborea)

Family Ochnaceae  
In South Africa there are 12 species and twenty species in southern Africa, including Zimbabwe and Mozambique.
 With such attractive flowers in all species of Ochna, bees and butterflies are favourite companions of these plants. During the flowering season a chorus of melodies is heard as bees visit to draw out nectar.
The art of colour exhibition is also witnessed as butterflies glorify the season. These insects assist in pollination of Ochna species. Some bird species find the ripe fruit palatable.
An evergreen shrub to medium-sized tree, up to 12 m high. The leaves are oblong, leathery and glossy green with serrated margins. The bright yellow flowers are borne in clusters, on short lateral shoots. Flowering time: Aug.–Jan. The ripe fruit consists of 1–5 kidney-shaped, shiny black carpels on an enlarged receptacle, inside the red, petal-like sepals. Fruiting time: Nov.–Feb. The plant occurs in Limpopo, Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape, also in Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

Info: http://www.plantzafrica.com